And which. When to use 2019-01-09

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Who, That, Which

and which

Examples: That is a book which I need for the class. For each of the following, choose the correct sentence. But, you would probably use which color if you are choosing between two items, already defined, in a different sentence, like this: a Which color shoes should I wear with this dress—blue or black? He went downtown to pick up his wife, Judy. For example: The mayor announced June 1 the fund would be exhausted. But there's “who,” too Restrictive and non-restrictive clauses need not begin with “that” and “which.


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When to use

and which

You can use which when you have a very small or limited field to choose from. It does not limit the possibilities to the Van Gogh that was in the foyer. Putting the comma before “who” makes what follows a non-restrictive clause. Non-restrictive clauses are set off by commas because the information they provide is supplementary, not essential to the meaning of the sentence. Technically, very few apps need your location.

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and

and which

No “who” or “which” or “that”? Without it, the reader's first impression is that the plan itself has been put forth. C Both A and B are correct. D Ahmed is the skydiver which broke his back last week. Use the preposition that means what you intend. Also, there are many other prepositions that can be paired with which: under, during, about, over, etc. In edited prose three-fourths of the clauses in which which is the relative pronoun are restrictive: A novel which he later wrote quickly became a bestseller. Correct Nonrestrictive Use: The painting, which was hanging in the foyer, was stolen.

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Which

and which

Which introduces a nonessential clause also known as a nonrestrictive or nondefining clause , which adds supplementary information. The statue that stands in the hall is on loan from the museum. Some apps, though, are completely useless without enabling location services, navigation apps being the biggest ones. The lawnmower that is in the garage needs sharpening. Important note involving “which”: “Non-essential” does not mean that the information is not important or that it's not relevant. But don't let your desire to lop off unnecessary words lead you into bad judgment. In answer to your question about shoes, you would most likely ask what color, not which color, if you haven't seen the shoes yet and you want the owner of the shoes to tell you the color.


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When to use

and which

This common British is not strictly incorrect in American English, but it is generally avoided, especially in formal writing. For formal writing or speech any relative pronoun serving as an object must be one that 'takes' the objective case, for example, whom, whose, or which, but usually not who and never that—both who and that usually take the subjective case: Jack is the boy with whom Jenny fell in love formal Jack built the house in which I was raised formal but not Jack is the boy with who Jenny fell in love colloquial; or not okay and never Jack built the house in that I was raised not okay. Summary and not a complete answer but a general one : The preposition depends on the verb that takes a preposition, a phrasal verb that includes a preposition, or it depends on the prepositional phrase used. Essential clauses add information that is vital to the point of the sentence. A We have a city council who takes care of business.

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That

and which

The statue, which stands in the hall, is on loan from the museum. You know that there are many, many ways that exist to address your question, and you want to find out—from all those possibilities that you might not even know about—what the best way is. C We have a city council that takes care of business. The relative pronoun which refers to inanimate things and to animals: The house, which we had seen only from a distance, impressed us even more as we approached. Maybe I'm not understanding your question, but I don't understand the confusion here. It's essential and non-essential to know “That” restricts the reader's thought, directing attention to a specific bit of information to complete a message's meaning. Explanation: While this nonrestrictive use tells us that the painting was hanging in the foyer, it does not tell us which of the several paintings in the foyer was the stolen painting.

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Who, That, Which

and which

Examples: Anya is the one who rescued the bird. It also changes the sentence to imply that we helped all the guides and all of 'em were sick with malaria. Correct Restrictive Use: The painting that was hanging in the foyer was stolen. These principles, first put forward in the 1920s, are widely taught in America by traditional English instructors, but are not necessarily the practice of all writers and editors. He is the man who will be teaching the class. Not all the guides had malaria, and we helped only those who were sick with malaria.

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Why Do So Many Apps Ask For Your Location, and Which Ones Really Need It?

and which

We have only one lawnmower. He went downtown to pick up his wife Judy. The key to proper usage of these words is learning the difference between and relative clauses. Example: That which doesn't kill you makes you stronger. While some writers seem to have abandoned the distinction entirely, no better rule has come along to replace the traditional rule.

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